Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Vogue 8346: View B - Part 5, Sleeve Heads

Today I want to talk about how I set in the sleeves on my coat.  The method I used was the bias strip method, which I've used before with great success.  The first time I can across this was on the Craftsy Starlet Suit Jacket class by Gretchen Hirsch.  I don't think this is available any more, but here's a video on how to do it from Gertie's Blog For Better Sewing. 

Here's a run through of what I did.  I cut two strips of my coat fabric on the bias, they're 2" wide and 12" long.


Fold the strips in half lengthwise, and mark the middle with a pin or a little snip with the scissors.


Pin the centre of the strip to the top of the sleeve head on the wrong side.  It's not very easy to see in this photo, but the strip is pinned to the point where the top of the sleeve head lines up with the shoulder seam - it's marked with the middle lilac tailor tack.  

The strip gets sewn to the sleeve head with a 1/2" seam allowance.  


How you do this is to pull the bias strip taut, and slightly push the sleeve head under the foot at the same time as it goes through the machine.  Start at the top of the sleeve head, where the strip is pinned, and work to the end of the strip.  


 This all sort of magically gathers up the ease in the sleeve head, as you can see below!


And here's what it looks like from the inside.


Then it gets pinned into the coat armhole, and sewn in.


I read a great tip on a website somewhere about using the bias strip to pad out the sleeve head.  I can't remember what website it was though, and I think it was something in the comments.

Anyway, what you do is fold the bias strip back on itself towards the seam, pin and hand sew in place.  Here it is pinned in place, sorry about the flash photo, I was doing this at night time.

  
And here it is hand sewn in place.


And this is what it looks like from the outside!


Lynne

12 comments:

  1. Thank you; this is very helpful. The sleeve looks terrific.

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    1. Thanks Bernice! I'm very pleased with how they turned out.

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  2. Thank you for all your fantastic posts on coat construction.
    I am hoping to make my first wool coat soon. I've made a wearable test version in a jacket length gaberdine version which went well except the pockets were too high up the princess seams. Your sleeve is beautiful. I'd be really happy to achieve that level of perfection in a sleeve. Looking forward to seeing the finished coat. Thank you.

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    1. Thanks Elaine! I'm glad so many people have found these posts interesting, and good luck with your coat!

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  3. What a great tip! Saving this for future reference

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    1. Thanks Diane! Honestly, this is so easy to do!

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  4. I think that's a fabulous technique, and the proof is your sleeves look great.

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    1. Thanks Mags! This has worked perfectly every time I've done it.

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  5. Your finished sleeve looks great! It's really interesting to watch your coat take shape!

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    1. Thanks Ruth! I really love how the sleeves look.

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  6. You must have so much patience. I would get frustrated if things didn't work out how I wanted straight away!

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    1. Thanks Helen! I have a lot of patience for things I enjoy, like sewing and knitting. Things I don't enjoy, like cooking - not so much. Let's just say if you asked me to peel a potato, I'd probably launch it across the room!

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Thank you for reading my blog! I love reading your comments, so please feel free to leave a comment if you have the time :) Lynne.